RADAR AND SATELLITE
NATIONAL WEATHER RADAR
REGIONAL NEXRAD WEATHER RADAR
These Two Sites Will Also Give You Some Other Single Site NEXRAD Weather Radar Options
WEATHER SATELLITE IMAGES
Visible Weather Satellite Images

The satellite measures sunlight reflected by the clouds and surface of the earth. Water absorbs a lot of sunlight (it reflects just a little) so it appears dark. The percent of sunlight reflected by the land is called the surface albedo. The albedo of land ranges from about 10-30%, except for snow covered surfaces where the albedo is much higher. A cloud's albedo is generally high, but can vary with its thickness and composition. Thick clouds have high albedos and show up bright in the satellite image. Thin cirrus clouds have low albedos and are usually semi-transparent to sunlight. The structure of clouds in the satellite image can tell the meteorologist a lot about the weather and animations tell him about the movement of weather systems.
[HIT THE REFRESH BUTTON TO UPDATE RADARS]

"NOAA's GOES-16 satellite has not been declared operational and its data are preliminary and undergoing testing."

GOES-16, previously known as GOES-R, is an American weather satellite, which, upon completion of testing, will form part of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system operated by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is the first of the next generation of geosynchronous environmental satellite. It is expected to provide atmospheric and surface measurements of the Earth’s Western Hemisphere for weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, space weather monitoring and meteorological research.

NEXRAD WEATHER RADAR SINGLE SITES